The Great Debate

Written by Sofia Sicignano |

Thursday, October 27, 2016: The day of the Great Debate. Our very own Morgan School was used as a vessel to host the state House of Representatives debate, as well as  the state Senate debate. The event was even moderated by Morgan’s own Political Club leaders Wyatt Rue and Daniel Radka. The debate was set up by Political Club leader Eric Bergman.

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Candidates running for the House from each party came to share their ideas to try to garner votes. There was Republican Jesse Maclachlan, Democrat Ellen Dahlgren, and Libertarian Austin Coco. Unfortunately, the Green party candidate, Morgan alumni Ian Barron, did not participate.

The questions asked were rigorous, but each candidate articulated the answers well. The first question asked in the House debate was provided by Sophomore Daniel Radka: “As a representative in the state house, you will be tasked with working with others to balance the state budget. All four of you agree that taxes should not be raised and services should not be cut, rather our tax base must grow in order to erase the current deficit. If you are all proposing relatively similar ideas, how is your specific approach different or more effective than those of your opponents?”

Mrs. Dahlgren responded that it is important to broaden our tax base by investing in environmental clean-up causes. Not only would it help our environment, but it would boost our economy with the new industry, as well as preserve our tourism income.

Mr. Coco claimed that his approach would be to clean up Long Island Sound to jump start the economy.

Mr. Maclachlan, who is running for re-election, talked about bipartisanship and budgeting, and his ideas on eliminating long-term debt in our state, considering Connecticut’s one of the most indebted states per capita. 

The debate continued with four more questions concerning the economy, the environment, and each answered the questions similarly to the first.

With such important issues being addressed, this debate would help voters make a more educated decision on Election Day. If you like more information to help with your Election Day Decision, check out the article  Elections, Candidates, and Parties, Oh My!

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